Humanities

6th Grade Humanities is a rigorous introduction to the English Language Arts skills necessary to succeed in middle school at CCSC. While focusing on World Geography and American Civics, students develop critical techniques for reading comprehension, expository writing, and discussing complex ideas with peers. Students read a variety of texts and learn how to argue their ideas using well-chosen evidence to back up their claims. Students explore a continent of the world each unit during the first semester, and then finish the year with a focus on the narratives and counter-narratives that constitute the Revolutionary period history of the United States of America.

7th Grade Humanities blends English Language Arts and History. Students spend a significant amount of time reading—whether as a whole class, in pairs, or independently. Class texts introduce students to fiction, myths, poetry, dramas, primary source documents, and nonfiction secondary literature. In addition, students are asked to compose both expository and narrative compositions to further develop their skills as writers. Teachers check-in with students throughout the entire writing process as students gain independence and confidence in their ability to construct essays. Vocabulary, note-taking, presentation skills and core writing skills (including grammar and mechanics) are reinforced throughout the year. Whole-class reading selections and written compositions align with the historical focus of the course, which explores the theme of civilizations. Students begin their study of history by analyzing how civilizations develop, and in the first quarter they do an overview the Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations of the Ancient Near East. In the second and third quarters, students study ancient Greece and ancient Rome to understand how these civilizations developed, expanded, and unraveled. In the fourth quarter, students will connect the innovations and shortcomings of these civilizations to the United States by analyzing the structure of the American government and reflecting on the degree to which our nation has addressed the challenges faced by its ancient predecessors.

8th Grade Humanities students study five major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism in order to become more conscious world citizens.  We will explore a variety of texts, including novels, short stories, scripture, poetry, drama and non-fiction, that connect both thematically and topically to the religions we study. Students build skills in reading, note taking, writing, and critical thinking. In addition, they also receive a solid grounding in grammar, mechanics, and other bedrock writing skills.

9th Grade Humanities is a rigorous introduction to the world history content and English Language Arts skills necessary to succeed at the high school level. While focusing on essential issues such as the power of the individual in history, students develop critical techniques for reading comprehension, expository writing, note-taking, and discussing complex ideas with peers. Students wrestle with a variety of texts and learn how to argue their ideas in multi-paragraph essays using well-chosen evidence to back up their claims. Students explore four exciting periods in world history starting with the development of Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire and continuing through the rise of colonialism and its consequences up to the present day.

9th Grade Reader’s Workshop 9th Grade Humanities is a rigorous introduction to world history content and English Language Arts skills necessary to succeed at the high school level. While focusing on essential issues such as the power of the individual in history, students develop critical techniques for reading comprehension, expository writing, note-taking, and discussing complex ideas with peers. Students wrestle with a variety of texts and learn how to argue their ideas in five-paragraph essays using well-chosen evidence to back up their claims. Students explore four exciting periods in world history starting with the development of Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire and continuing through the rise of colonialism and its consequences up to the present day.

10th Grade Humanities is a survey of American History from the American Revolution through the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course emphasizes themes of oppression and resistance. The detailed study of specific historical moments (including the Boston Massacre, negotiating the Declaration of Independence, experiencing the Middle Passage, the uprisings of John Brown, and others) is accompanied by an examination of literary sources. A variety of texts allow students to gain further insight into the American Experience at the nation's birth and through its ongoing struggle for definition in the 19th Century.

11th Grade US History II is designed to prepare students for history courses at the college level. The course covers American history from the end of the Civil War to the modern era. Students will have ample opportunity to develop the historical thinking skills required by the AP US History exam, with a particular emphasis on causation, argumentation, and the use and analysis of historical evidence. The course aims to balance factual knowledge with the analytical skills that are necessarily to think critically and creatively about important problems in American history.

12th Grade Modern World History is designed to prepare students for history courses at the college level. In this class, we will examine a variety of complex modern world issues from the end of the 19th century to the present. Studying modern world history is different from studying earlier eras because we do not yet know where it is leading. Still, we can distinguish some key world historical processes that have been especially important in shaping the current era. These processes, sometimes unforeseen, have given rise to major new challenges to humanity. Other patterns and movements lie unknown, in the future. As with all events in history, each of these processes and issues can be analyzed through many perspectives. Students will work closely with primary and secondary sources and a variety of media to gain access to these perspectives. Throughout the course, we will also be developing skills that are essential to any academic course, including note-taking, text-based discussion, debating, writing, and research.

College Prep English is a newly-redesigned course at CCSC designed to prepare our juniors and seniors for the challenges they will face as readers and writers at the college level. Each quarter we will examine works of nonfiction and fiction related to a different part of our identity as American and global citizens—-race, gender, class, etc. Students will learn how to analyze and evaluate complex, nuanced arguments as well as construct their own. Students should expect frequent writing assignments—-both in-class timed and out-of-class extended prompts. Furthermore, the course will contain significant grammar and vocabulary instruction to ensure that students are ready for the demands of the SAT and their first year in college.

AP English Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods. As Henry David Thoreau says, it is wisest to read the best books first. Though we cannot read them all, our selection includes a wide variety of plays, novels, short stories, and poems. By building on close reading skills that have been developed in the sophomore and junior years, students will better be able to experience, interpret, and evaluate various works of literature. In addition, students will grow significantly in their writing abilities – by improving their vocabulary, developing their organization skills, and enhancing the sophistication of their writing. (Adapted from the College Board: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap-english-course-description.pdf)